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CFP Special Session Civil - Military Cooperation

Information systems (IS) for emergency preparedness and response are found in both civil and military fields. In the past, the civil and military communitiesí emergency response ISs have been largely isolated from one another.

Cooperative civil-military action in emergency response is becoming increasingly important in large-scale disaster response. September 11, 2001, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita showed how civil and military authorities have had to cooperate closely. Military aid to the civil power, humanitarian operations, and nation building all call for different government departments and ministries to work together. Moreover, civil and military authorities need to exchange information with international, non-governmental and commercial organisations that may well have their own information systems for emergency response. They require interoperable, dynamic information management systems to support this information exchange, to maintain situational awareness, and to build a common operational picture.

When civil and military organisations cooperate, issues need to be overcome at the technical and operational levels. At the technical level, the ISs must be able to faithfully exchange information that is understood by all parties. This requires standards not only for IS interoperability, but also agreements on what terminology is to be used, how data will be exchanged, and even what symbols will be used to represent various classes of assets. At the operational level, the ISs must bridge various command & control structures and organisational and professional cultures. The military mind-set differs sharply from that of the fire, police and medical emergency services, an NGO, a commercial supplier, or a global news-gathering organisation.

Session chairs: Geert Gijs, Tim Grant, Benny Carle and Mark Goodman.

More information in the Special Session Call for Papers

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